Category Archives: Blog

Who voted for whom? Vote choice in the 2017 Catalan election

In this blog post, we present some further analyses of the data from the Making Electoral Democracy Work 2017 Catalan election study. Our focus is now on demographics.   To determine which characteristics help explain vote choice in the 2017 Catalan election, we ran bivariate multinomial logistic regressions of vote choice on each of the […]

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Who voted for whom? Vote choice in the 2017 Catalan election

In this blog post, we present some further analyses of the data from the Making Electoral Democracy Work 2017 Catalan election study. Our focus is now on demographics.   To determine which characteristics help explain vote choice in the 2017 Catalan election, we ran bivariate multinomial logistic regressions of vote choice on each of the […]

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The Structure of Party Ratings in Catalonia

The Making Electoral Democracy Work (MEDW) project conducted an online survey over the seven days preceding the regional election held on December 21 in Catalonia with a sample of 1500 respondents (obtained from Survey Sample International).  Respondents were weighted so that our sample is representative in terms of age, gender, province, the decision to vote, […]

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The Recent Election in Catalonia: A Vote on Independence

On December 21st, Catalans voted in an election to their regional Parliament. Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy called the election hoping to lower the tension caused by the crisis over independence. However, as in the previous regional election held in 2015, pro-independence parties collectively won a majority of seats. At the same time, the party […]

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Catalan Election Survey

In the context of the historic election that will be held on December 21st in Catalonia, Making Electoral Democracy Work (MEDW) has decided to run a pre-electoral survey. The survey is being run by Eric Guntermann, André Blais (Université de Montréal), Ignacio Lago (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), and Marc Guinjoan (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona). It will […]

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Party influence where predispositions are strong and party identification is weak: Assessing citizens’ reactions to party cues on regional nationalism in Spain

By Eric Guntermann, Postdoctoral researcher at the Research Chair in Electoral Studies and research coordinator for Making Electoral Democracy Work   Do parties influence opinions on nationalism in Spain? Numerous studies have shown that parties influence opinions, especially in the US (e.g. Cohen, 2003; Druckman et al., 2013; Kam, 2005). It is unclear, however, whether such […]

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When David and Goliath campaign online: the effects of digital media use during electoral campaigns on vote for small parties

What is the story? A growing literature examines the effects of digital media on the fortunes of challenger parties. Challengers might have an advantage online given that digital technologies are making small contenders more visible compared to big ones. Moreover, the plurality of new media will cater to niche audiences, undermining the appeal of mainstream […]

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What Do Political Scientists Know About Electoral Reform that Practitioners Do Not? A View from Europe and Canada

Camille Bedock (University of Brussels), Damien Bol (King’s College London), Thomas Ehrhard (University of Paris II)   What is the story? When politicians or public officials consider changing the electoral system, they often seek advice from political scientists. The APSA Task Force on Political Science, Electoral Rules and Democratic Governance conducted a survey on the […]

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Does Democratic Consolidation Lead to a Decline in Voter Turnout? Global Evidence Since 1939

  By Filip Kostelka, Institutions and Political Economy Research Group (IPERG), University of Barcelona & Centre d’études européennes, Sciences Po, Paris   Voting rates in new democracies often decline dramatically. For instance, in less than twenty years after democratization, voter turnout fell by 17.5 percentage points (pp) in Portugal (which has held democratic elections since […]

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What’s Happening in Catalonia? The Crackdown May Increase Support for an Unpopular Plan

By Eric Guntermann, Université de Montréal People all over the world this week read about Spanish police arresting Catalan government officials and confiscating ballots for an independence referendum. Rather than harming the Catalan government, however, I argue that the crackdown may help it raise support for its unpopular roadmap towards independence. In the last regional […]

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